Laughter Therapy and Its Benefits

Laughter is used in therapy to help reduce pain and tension while also improving a person's sense of well-being. It could be used to assist individuals deal with serious illnesses like cancer. Laughter therapy might include exercises, clowns, comic movies, literature, games, and riddles, among other things. It's a form of supplemental medicine. Humor therapy is another name for it.



Why Is Laughter Therapy Beneficial?

Meetings have become more boring and less interactive as a result of Pandemic. We don't have as many opportunities to laugh with each other as we had before covid. Laughter therapy is a great way to break the ice and make conversations more enjoyable.


You'll feel like you're sitting next to each other if you laugh in front of the screen while staring at each other.


Customer Satisfaction:


Laughter Therapy has helped a lot of tech startups. The following are some of the most frequently cited advantages:

  • Everyone instantly perked up

  • After attending Laughter Therapy, team members demonstrated more ownership at work the following week

  • It shattered barriers

  • It reminded them of their pre-covid escapades


ANXIETY AND OTHER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS CAN BE REDUCED BY LAUGHTER:

Laughter therapy has also been demonstrated to lower anxiety and depression in nursing students, as well as enhance optimism, self-esteem, and depression in postmenopausal women.



LAUGHTER ACTIVATES THE IMMUNE SYSTEM:

Laughter therapy may be beneficial during the start of cold and flu season, since multiple studies have demonstrated the immune-boosting power of a chuckle.


LAUGHTER ACT AS A NATURAL ANTIDEPRESSANT:

While no one would prescribe laughter as a treatment for depression, it has been found to help people feel better. Long-term care patients frequently suffer from sadness and poor sleep, therefore a 2017 study published in the Korean Journal of Adult Nursing looked at the effects of laughing therapy on 42 residents of two long-term care facilities. The outcomes were encouraging.



TEAM-BUILDING:

Humans may be the only ones who can laugh. What motivates us to do it? Laughter and smiling are often intended as a message of good will, according to a 2010 study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.